RISD: Shibori Scarves Workshop

  • Shibori Scarves Workshop
    2013
     
    Shibori, an ancient Japanese textile tradition dating back to the 8th Century, is a process of dying cloth through stitching, binding folding, twisting and clamping, thus creating unique patterns and texture. In this workshop I was first introduced to the many variations within the technique, including Kanoko, Kumo and Nui, by first making small samples to grasp the basics that can then be used for reference when making larger pieces. This is followed by stitching cotton and silk scarves and submerging them in dye baths. Procion dyes are used, and learning how to work with the dyes is an integral aspect of the process.
  • Shibori Handkerchief
  • Started with a white silk handkerchief and tested out three binding methods and then dyed.
     
    Chevron Stripe (Upper right diagonal): straight lines marked with disappearing ink, pinched and stitched with cotton thread.
     
    Japanese larch (middle diagonal): half circles marked with disappearing ink and stitched with cotton thread.
     
    Shell Shibori (bottom left diagonal): cloth was drawn up and pinched while bound with plastic elastics. It was then dyed in MX Reactive dye, stirred lightly, soda ash was then added.
     
    Finally the fabric was rinsed, washed with a Synthrapol wash and washed again.
  • Shibori Shawl
  • Began with a white cotton shawl and tested out one folding method and two binding methods.
     
    Bottom Left detail: Cloth was folded and pinched at random then bound with cotton thread.
     
    Bottom Middle detail: Katano Shibori: The cloth was folded into vertical pleats then circular stitching combined with small tack stitches through all layers directs the flow of the dye.
     
    Bottom Right detail: Komasu Shibori modified: Cloth was folded in half, disappearing ink was then used to mark triangles, then cotton thread is sewn with a large running stitch. (Top left image) Each section is drawn up and knotted. Second stage is to bind each of the points together.
     
    It was then dyed in MX Reactive dye, stirred lightly, soda ash was then added. Finally the fabric was rinsed, washed with a Synthrapol wash and washed again.
  • Shibori Neck Wrap
  • Arashhi Shibori (American Adaptation): Started with a white silk neck wrap, wrapped the fabric around a PVC pipe, wrapped cotton thread around fabric to resist the dye, and then pushed the fabric up the pipe, alternating in a straight and twisted motion.
     
    It was then dyed in MX Reactive dye, stirred lightly, soda ash was then added. Finally the fabric was rinsed, washed with a Synthrapol wash and washed again.