ING HWANG

  • ING HWANG
  • My work is a conversation I am having with machines. It’s an homage to the machine,
    it’s a competition with the machine, and it’s me putting myself in the shoes of the
    machine, and mimicking it. Architecture has always been a very important part of my
    life, especially modern architecture following the ideas of Adolf Loos, who talked
    about removal of unnecessary ornamentation; “The evolution of culture marches with
    the elimination of ornament from useful objects,” in his Ornament and Crime. Only
    modern architecture is essential because it is shelter, and there is no decoration, and
    since I was a child I was fascinated with the feeling of calm and serenity this idea
    brought to my life. I’m obsessed with this form because it allows ultimate growth
    and evolution in that specific area without any distraction, and it allows ultimate
    organization. I think it’s easiest for me to relate to architecture because it’s not so
    organic and it’s easily replicable. I am not trying to create decoration for interior
    space, for that would go against Loos’ ideas, but trying to take this philosophy and
    apply to fine arts and this is my interpretation of this idea.
    This will be the 6th set of forms I create that is 24” x 24” x 24”. I have added more
    skeletal structure so the shell doesn’t warp, I have increased the time I have for this
    set of works and so cuts will be more precise, and pieces will fit together with more
    precision. I am not concerned with making new images, concepts, or themes, but just
    different versions and stages of my formula worked on throughout the different stages
    of my life.
    My work is driven by introspective thought and meditation on themes of responsibility,
    family, and machine process. I create my sculptures by building with shaped foam
    core, and mat board, allowing their forms to take shape through a gradual process
    of refinement that parallels individual development and coming of age. Beyond mere
    formal studies, my work functions as a paradigm of my relationship with the universe, a
    totemic physical manifestation of dedication and duty.